Corrective Voice Therapy: What to Expect

Voice disorders can strike anyone, of any age, often in response to straining or overuse, which results in a condition called dysphonia. The raspy, breathy voice that’s typical of dysphonia usually clears up within a week or so.  

For some people, though, dysphonia persists longer, and this can be a real problem if they rely on their voice to get through the day. A hoarse voice often responds to conservative corrective voice therapy, so there’s no reason to avoid treatment. 

Lawrence Otolaryngology Associates has a speech team ready to help you, once their doctors diagnose the cause of your hoarseness. Make an appointment today to help regain your voice. 

Understanding voice disorders

Your ability to make sounds and form words depends on the vocal folds in the larynx, or voice box. Like other parts of your body that move, the vocal folds include muscle and cartilage. In addition, muscles of the larynx position the vocal folds for their various motions, including opening to allow the passage of air as you breathe. 

Like other muscles, your vocal folds can pick up bad habits or types of movement that aren’t efficient. This can result in poor positioning that causes voice changes, like hoarseness, breathiness, lack of control, or low volume. 

It’s classified as a disorder when these changes are persistent and ongoing, showing no signs of gradual improvement. 

What to expect from voice therapy

Physical Therapy for the voice, called Voice Therapy, is often an important part of your path to recovery.  After surgery, you may expect physical therapy as part of your recovery program. You can compare corrective voice therapy to a physical therapy routine for your vocal folds and larynx muscles. 

Voice therapy usually follows any medical treatment you may require for conditions that contribute to your voice disorder. 

The nature of your therapy depends on what’s causing the voice issues, but you can expect exercises that help you to use your voice in a way that eases strain and supports correct motion while limiting movement that could lead to continued irritation of larynx tissue. 

Your exercises may include: 

If you’re overcoming a physical issue with your larynx or recovering from vocal fold surgery, you may have modified exercises that give your vocal folds and larynx a chance to heal. As with other types of physical therapy, you may have self-directed home exercises. It’s important to follow your therapist’s directions for best results. 

Contact Lawrence Otolaryngology Associates in Lawrence or Ottawa to arrange a consultation to assess your voice disorder. Your doctor will diagnose the condition and advise you if you could benefit from corrective voice therapy. Call now to schedule your appointment at the most convenient location. 

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