A Time of Celebration and Thanksgiving!

A Time of Celebration and Thanksgiving!

We have started a new year and the holiday season is winding down. In addition to the more familiar holidays, we recently celebrated a couple of milestones at the Kansas Voice Center. We celebrated the 100th birthday of “the chair” as well as the 20th anniversary of the formation of the Kansas Voice Center. We had a great celebration complete with a barber chair birthday cake and various games, but the main cause for celebration is the wonderful people. My wife, Tandy, and my youngest daughter, Hannah, came and I was surprised and thrilled with my parents’ appearance. My oldest daughter, Liesel lives out of town.

All of the people that make the Voice Center “tick” were also there. We have a tendency to think that great medical care in the 21st century means looking for the latest technology or the largest medical center. At the Kansas Voice Center we do maintain excellent technology for the diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders but this is only the first step. We try to treat every individual who comes to our office in the same manner that we would want to be treated – with kindness, care, and professional expertise. This starts with our front desk telephone interactions and check in and continues with our nurses, speech and laryngeal professionals, and includes our billing department, surgical scheduling staff, medical records department, and our administration.

A couple of people deserve special mention in their contribution to the voice center. Jennifer Cannady is the speech pathologist of the voice center. She has been here sharing her expertise for nearly 18 years. Speech pathology is a broad field and Jennifer is truly an expert in the treatment and evaluation of those with vocal concerns. Jennifer is also an accomplished singer and is quite aware of the needs of professional and amateur singers. Cortney Kelly is our office administrator and has the Brobdingnagian task of directing all parts of the office – she is a caring individual and has done a wonderful job. Dynelle Kessler also provides invaluable expertise behind the scenes in helping Cortney and working on various administrative Voice Center projects.

It truly does take a team of professional and caring individuals to provide excellent medical and voice care. We have a great team – there is reason to celebrate and be thankful!

Dr. Reussner, his wife Tandy, his daughter Hannah and his parents

Dr. Martinez!

Dr. Reussner and Jennifer Cannady

Author
Dr. Lee A. Reussner

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